Ad Te Levávi Ánimam Meam

To Thee have I lifted up my soul (Introit – 1st Sunday of Advent)

Posts Tagged ‘breviary’

Quicumque Vult

Posted by james0235 on May 17, 2008

“Quicumque vult salvus esse, ante omnia opus est, ut teneat catholicam fidem”

The Athanasian Creed, attributed to but most likely not composed by St. Athanasius, is one of the most profound statements on the Holy Trinity that the Church has ever produced.

Liturgically it is used in the Divine Office of the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite where it is said during the office of Prime on Trinity Sunday. I do not believe that the Athanasian Creed is currently used at all in the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite. And it is not used by the Eastern Catholic Churches.

Unfortunately its extremely limited use means that very few Catholics ever hear it. I’m trying to get in the habit of reciting it at least once a year on Trinity Sunday.

Whosoever will be saved, before all things it is necessary that he hold the Catholic faith. Which faith except everyone do keep whole and undefiled, without doubt he shall perish everlastingly. And the catholic faith is this: That we worship one God in Trinity, and Trinity in Unity, neither confounding the persons, nor dividing the substance.

For there is one Person of the Father, another of the Son, and another of the Holy Spirit. But the godhead of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, is all one, the glory equal, the majesty co-eternal.

Such as the Father is, such is the Son, and such is the Holy Spirit. The Father uncreated, the Son uncreated, and the Holy Spirit uncreated. The Father incomprehensible, the Son incomprehensible, and the Holy Spirit incomprehensible.

The Father eternal, the Son eternal, and the Holy Spirit eternal. And yet they are not three eternals, but one Eternal.

As also there are not three incomprehensibles, nor three uncreated, but one Uncreated, and one Incomprehensible. So likewise the Father is Almighty, the Son Almighty, and the Holy Spirit Almighty. And yet they are not three almighties, but one Almighty.

So the Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Spirit is God. And yet they are not three gods, but one God.

So likewise the Father is Lord, the Son Lord, and the Holy Spirit Lord. And yet not three lords, but one Lord.

For as we are compelled by the Christian verity to acknowledge each Person by Himself to be both God and Lord, so we are also forbidden by the catholic religion to say that there are three gods or three lords.

The Father is made of none, neither created, nor begotten. The Son is of the Father alone, not made, nor created, but begotten. The Holy Spirit is of the Father, neither made, nor created, nor begotten, but proceeding.

So there is one Father, not three fathers; one Son, not three sons; one Holy Spirit, not three holy spirits.

And in the Trinity none is before or after another; none is greater or less than another, but all three Persons are co-eternal together and co-equal. So that in all things, as is aforesaid, the Unity in Trinity and the Trinity in Unity is to be worshipped.

He therefore that will be saved is must think thus of the Trinity.

Furthermore, it is necessary to everlasting salvation that he also believe rightly the Incarnation of our Lord Jesus Christ. For the right faith is, that we believe and confess, that our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is God and man; God, of the substance of the Father, begotten before the worlds; and man of the substance of his mother, born in the world; perfect God and perfect man, of a rational soul and human flesh subsisting. Equal to the Father, as touching His godhead; and inferior to the Father, as touching His manhood; who, although He is God and man, yet he is not two, but one Christ; one, not by conversion of the godhead into flesh but by taking of the manhood into God; one altogether; not by confusion of substance, but by unity of person. For as the rational soul and flesh is one man, so God and man is one Christ; who suffered for our salvation, descended into hell, rose again the third day from the dead. He ascended into heaven, He sits at the right hand of the Father, God Almighty, from whence He will come to judge the quick and the dead. At His coming all men will rise again with their bodies and shall give account for their own works. And they that have done good shall go into life everlasting; and they that have done evil into everlasting fire.

This is the Catholic faith, which except a man believe faithfully, he cannot be saved.

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Lenten Plans

Posted by james0235 on February 11, 2008

Lent isn’t going exactly as I had planned. I was sick and so I got off to a late start. But, I have finally started a few things:

1. Mass

In addition to Sundays I am often able to get to Mass at least once throughout the week. I keep a stack of parish bulletins in my car so I always have Mass time information at hand. There are several parishes which offer Masses around noon and even a couple with evening Masses.

During Lent I would typically attend a Wednesday evening Mass that was added just for Lent. My thought was that I would make sure to attend this Mass and then in addition to that I would attend another weekday Mass on another day. And then I learned that this Mass was not going to be offered this year. And a few days later I learned that it was going to be offered after all. So, assuming that it is still on, I should be attending at least 2 daily Masses for Lent. I missed Ash Wednesday but I am looking forward to this week.

2. Liturgy of the Hours

christianprayer.jpgThis is something which I used to do quite regularly. I started years ago praying Compline (Night Prayer) on universalis.com. Then I moved on to the one volume Christian Prayer.

And then I moved from Christian Prayer to a book called the Anglican Breviary. The Anglican Breviary is essentially the Roman Breviary (pre-Vatican II version of the Liturgy of the Hours) translated into “Elizebethan” English. Despite its name it is really a Catholic prayer book. For over a year I prayed Compline nightly and Vespers on Sundays. I tried to use English for the Psalms and Latin for some of the prayers – Our Father, Hail Mary, Creed, Confiteor, etc. During this time I would also occasionally use Christian Prayer or The Monastic Diurnal (pre-Vatican II Benedictine Divine Office).

Somewhere along the way I stopped. And I intend to use Lent as an excuse to start again. I am beginning again with Christian Prayer. My plan was to begin on Ash Wednesday and pray Compline nightly and Vespers on Sundays. I actually didn’t start until last night. I prayed Vespers and Compline and it went so quickly that I am considering praying Vespers every night in addition to Compline.

After I get back into the swing of things I may go back to the pre-Vatican II version. But, before I do, I want to try out a book called Prayer of Christians. This was the American Interim Breviary – the version of the Divine Office that was used in the U.S. from 1971 until the Liturgy of the Hours was released in Latin (1972 – 1973) and translated into English by ICEL (1975). This one shouldn’t be too difficult to figure out. According to the late Fr. John Hardon “the revised Liturgy of the Hours is in every respect more detailed than the simplified Prayer of Christians…”.

3. Stations of the Cross

This one should be easy. Just about every parish seems to offer this on Friday evenings. I have also noticed a couple of parishes offering it on Mondays and even one parish offering it on Thursday afternoon.

4. Spiritual Readinglifeofchrist.jpg

I was considering following the Church Fathers Lenten Reading Plan. It looks to be excellent and I may use it next year. But, I have decided on my own, less structured, plan. I am beginning with Life of Christ by Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen (Chapter 1 available online).

After I finish that I am going to move on to Volume 1 of Faith of the Early Fathers and see how far I get.

5. Fasting

I have decided to do a 24 hour fast at least once a week during Lent. I may end up doing this on both Wednesdays and Fridays.

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O Antiphons

Posted by james0235 on December 23, 2007

This is just a compilation of all of my previous posts on the O Antiphons:

O Come, O Come Emmanuel

An explanation of what the O Antiphons are, the original Latin, an English translation, and the relevant verse of O Come, O Come Emmanuel derived from each of the Antiphons

O Wisdom
O Lord
O Root Of Jesse
O Key Of David
O Day-Spring
O King Of Nations
O Emmanuel

These posts on each of the individual Antiphons gives the official translation used in the Liturgy of the Hours in the United States

The O Antiphons And The Mass

How the O Antiphons are used in the Mass

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The O Antiphons And The Mass

Posted by james0235 on December 23, 2007

While the O Antiphons that form the basis of O Come, O Come Emmanuel are most typically heard during Vespers they are also used in the Mass. Sort of.

In the Missal of Paul VI, the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite, the O Antiphons are used as the Alleluia Verse before the Gospel. They have been rearranged and they are worded a little differently. But, they are there.

Rather than being prayed from December 17 to December 23 as in the Liturgy of the Hours, these Alleluia Verses are used from December 17 to the morning Mass of December 24 (not the Vigil Mass of Christmas) with the exception of Sunday Mass.

To accomplish this the Alleluia Verse of December 22 is repeated on December 23 to stretch the 7 Antiphons over 8 days. They have also been rearranged. We no longer have the “Ero Cras” or “Tomorrow I will be” that is seen when reading the first letter (in Latin) of each Antiphon backwards from the December 23rd to the 17th.

The Table below shows the differences:

Date

Dec. 17
Dec. 18
Dec. 19
Dec. 20
Dec. 21
Dec. 22
Dec. 23
Dec. 24

Vespers

O Wisdom
O Sacred Lord*
O Root of Jesse
O Key of David
O Radiant Dawn
O King of Nations
O Emmanuel

Mass

O Wisdom
O Leader*
O Root of Jesse
O Key of David
O Emmanuel
O King of Nations
O King of Nations
O Radiant Dawn

* These are effectively the same thing. They are based on the same Antiphon but translated differently.

December 17th
Sapientia Altissimi, fortiter suaviterque disponens omnia:
veni ad docendum nos viam prudentiae.

Alleluia, alleluia. Come, Wisdom of our God Most High, guiding creation with power and love: teach us to walk in the paths of knowledge. Alleluia, alleluia.

December 18th

Dux domus Israel, qui Moysi in Sina legem dedisti:
veni ad redimendum nos in bracchio extento.

Alleluia, alleluia. O Leader of the House of Israel, giver of the Law to Moses on Sinai: come to rescue us with your mighty power! Alleluia, alleluia.

December 19

Radix Iesse, stans in signum populorum:
veni ad liberandum nos, iam noli tardare.

Alleluia, alleluia. O root of Jesse’s stem, sign of God’s love for all his people: come to save us without delay!

December 20th

Clavis David, qui aperis portas aeterni Regni:
veni et educ vinctum de domo carceris sedentem in tenebris.

Alleluia, alleluia. O Key of David, opening the gates of God’s eternal Kingdom: come and free the prisoners darkness! Alleluia, alleluia.

December 21st

Emmanuel, rex et legifer noster:
veni ad salvandum nos, Domine, Deus noster.

Alleluia, alleluia. O Emmanuel, our King and Giver of Law: come to save us, Lord our God! Alleluia, alleluia.

December 22nd and 23rd

Rex gentium et lapis angularis Ecclesiae:
veni et salva hominem quem de limo formasti.

Alleluia, alleluia. O King of all nations and keystone of the Church: come and save man, whom you formed from the dust! Alleluia, alleluia.

December 24th

Oriens, splendor lucis aeternae et sol iustitiae:
veni et illumina sedentes in tenebris et umbra mortis.

Alleluia, alleluia. O Radiant Dawn, splendor of eternal light, sun of justice: come and shine on those who dwell in darkness and in the shadow of death. Alleluia, alleluia.

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O Emmanuel

Posted by james0235 on December 23, 2007

An explanation of what these Antiphons are, the original Latin, and a more poetic English translation can be found in a previous post – O Come, O Come Emmanuel (link below). The official translation used in the Liturgy of the Hours in United States is used here.

O Emmanuel (Isaiah 7:14; 33:22 )

O Emmanuel, king and lawgiver, desire of the nations, Savior of all people, come and set us free, Lord our God.

O Come, O Come, Emmanuel,
And ransom captive Israel,
That mourns in lonely exile here,
Until the Son of God appear.

Previous Posts:
O Come, O Come Emmanuel
O Wisdom
O Lord
O Root Of Jesse
O Key Of David
O Day-Spring
O King Of Nations

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O King Of Nations

Posted by james0235 on December 22, 2007

An explanation of what these Antiphons are, the original Latin, and a more poetic English translation can be found in a previous post – O Come, O Come Emmanuel (link below). The official translation used in the Liturgy of the Hours in United States is used here.

O King of Nations (Haggai 2:7; Ephesians 2:14, 20)

O King of all the nations, the only joy of every human heart; O Keystone of the mighty arch of man, come and save the creature you fashioned from the dust.

O come, Desire of nations, bind,
In one the hearts of all mankind;
Bid Thou our sad divisions cease,
And be Thyself our King of peace.

Previous Posts:
O Come, O Come Emmanuel
O Wisdom
O Lord
O Root Of Jesse
O Key Of David
O Day-Spring

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O Day-Spring

Posted by james0235 on December 21, 2007

An explanation of what these Antiphons are, the original Latin, and a more poetic English translation can be found in a previous post – O Come, O Come Emmanuel (link below). The official translation used in the Liturgy of the Hours in United States is used here.

O Radiant Dawn (O Day-Spring) (Psalm107:10)

O Radiant Dawn, splendor of eternal light, sun of justice: come, shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death.

O come, Thou Dayspring, come and cheer,
Our spirits by Thine advent here;
Disperse the gloomy clouds of night,
And death’s dark shadows put to flight.

Previous Posts:
O Come, O Come Emmanuel
O Wisdom
O Lord
O Root Of Jesse
O Key Of David

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O Key Of David

Posted by james0235 on December 20, 2007

An explanation of what these Antiphons are, the original Latin, and a more poetic English translation can be found in a previous post – O Come, O Come Emmanuel (link below). The official translation used in the Liturgy of the Hours in United States is used here.

O Key of David (Isaiah 22:22, Revelation 3:7, Luke 1:79)

O Key of David, O royal Power of Israel controlling at your will the gate of heaven: come, break down the prison walls of death for those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death; and lead your captive people into freedom.

O Come, thou key of David, come,
And open wide our heavenly home;
Make safe the path that leads on high,
And close the path to misery.

Previous Posts:
O Come, O Come Emmanuel
O Wisdom
O Lord
O Root Of Jesse

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O Root Of Jesse

Posted by james0235 on December 19, 2007

An explanation of what these Antiphons are, the original Latin, and a more poetic English translation can be found in a previous post – O Come, O Come Emmanuel (link below). The official translation used in the Liturgy of the Hours in United States is used here.

O Root of Jesse (Isaiah 11:10)

O Flower of Jesse’s stem, you have been raised up as a sign for all peoples; kings stand silent in your presence; the nations bow down in worship before you. Come, let nothing keep you from coming to our aid.

O Come, O Rod of Jesse free,
Thine own from Satan’s tyranny;
From depths of hell Thy people save,
And give them victory o’er the grave.

Previous Posts:
O Come, O Come Emmanuel
O Wisdom
O Lord

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O Lord

Posted by james0235 on December 18, 2007

An explanation of what these Antiphons are, the original Latin, and a more poetic English translation can be found in a previous post – O Come, O Come Emmanuel (link below). The official translation used in the Liturgy of the Hours in United States is used here.

O Lord (Exodus 3:2, Exodus 20)

O sacred Lord of ancient Israel, who showed yourself to Moses in the burning bush, who gave him the holy law on Sinai mountain: come, stretch out your mighty hand to set us free.

O Come, O Come, thou Lord of might,
Who to Thy tribes on Sinai’s height,
In ancient times didst give the law,
In cloud and majesty, and awe.

Previous Posts:
O Come, O Come Emmanuel
O Wisdom

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